My audiobooks

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There are audiobook editions of seven of my twelve books on Audible, Amazon, and iTunes for everyone to enjoy. In a couple of weeks, there’ll be eight, when A Slice of the Seventies audiobook, narrated by Tracey Norman, will also be available on these sites.

THE HOSTILE is book 1 of The Hostile 4-book series of paranormal crime thrillers. I was the narrator on this audiobook, which is available on Audible, Amazon, and iTunes. In a rundown area of Manchester, inside the bathroom of a terraced house overflowing with children and dysfunctional parents, a small but powerful entity befriends young Serena with disastrous results. This unlikely enigmatic force not only dramatically affects introverted Serena’s life but also threatens the well-being of everyone she knows, especially those who’ve earned the strange girl’s displeasure. It soon becomes clear that nobody should ever upset Serena if they know what’s good for them. After enjoying The Hostile, you’ll never look at D.I.Y. in the same way again. http://adbl.co/2w2YLIm

HOLIDAY FOR THE HOSTILE is book 2 of The Hostile series. Narrated by Alexander Doddy, the audiobook is available on Audible, Amazon, and iTunes. Serena, plus her unusual friend and partner in crime, Tile X, find themselves suffering a family holiday at her eccentric grandfather’s hovel in Ireland. Who will manage to escape intact from their dramatic holiday from Hell? http://adbl.co/2wg4j21

THE HOSTILE GAME is book 3 of The Hostile series. Narrated by Alexander Doddy, the audiobook is available on Audible, Amazon, and iTunes. In The Hostile Game, Manchester-based Serena, now eighteen and pregnant, finally discovers the reason why Tile X befriended her seven years before. She doesn’t like what she hears. Mayhem ensues, with a retired Irish police superintendent becoming more involved than perhaps he should have. http://adbl.co/2fLE2Cz

CONFRONTING THE HOSTILE is book 4 in The Hostile paranormal crime thriller series. Narrated by Alexander Doddy. the audiobook is available on Audible, Amazon, and iTunes. A retired Irish superintendent and his former colleague, a handsome DCI from Liverpool, attempt to rid themselves and the world of their lethal tile masters. Will they succeed in reclaiming their freedom, or will the bizarre killing games continue? http://amzn.to/2vm1Vpn

HER DEMONIC ANGEL is my baker’s dozen of short stories. I wrote them in a variety of genres, so there should be something for everyone. Some tales are stranger than others, but all are different shades of dark. Narrated by me, the audiobook can be found on Audible, Amazon, and iTunes. http://adbl.co/2fMmeqN

RANDOM BULLETS is a contemporary crime thriller with a paranormal twist, set in Jersey, Manchester, London, and places not of this world. After shooting and killing his nephew, a gunman runs amok in a London park. What drives Edward to commit such atrocities? Who will survive yet another of his moments of madness? Narrated by Alexander Doddy, the audiobook is available on Audible, Amazon, and iTunes. http://adbl.co/2jQ09qt

POTHOLES AND MAGIC CARPETS is a contemporary character-driven novel. It looks at the dramatic incidents, challenges, and temptations in the lives of four couples of varying ages, professions and sexual persuasions, all linked by blood or friendship. The negative, selfish, sometimes violent natures of some characters in the book wreak havoc on the innocent. A tale of not so simple folk. The page-turning action in Potholes and Magic Carpets takes place in rural Kent and London. Narrated by Tracey Norman, the audiobook is available on Audible, Amazon, and iTunes. http://adbl.co/2iDAFvh

A SLICE OF THE SEVENTIES tells the loosely autobiographical story of Jersey-born Mug, a troubled girl from a recently broken home. It covers her experiences as a teenager at the Isle of Wight Music Festival in 1970, the same year she follows a guru. The book tracks her tumultuous four years as an art student in Coventry, where vegetarian Mug finds herself living next door to an abattoir and a railway shunting yard with David, a fellow art student. Dramatic events follow on from the evening they first meet at a party, where David is attempting to commit an extremely public suicide. Whether you were around during that decade or not, you’re bound to enjoy this nostalgic Slice of the Seventies. Narrated by Tracey Norman, the audiobook will be available on Audible, Amazon, and iTunes before the end of 2017.

My 12 books, in various formats, can all be found here: http://amzn.to/2jjmleB

Merry Christmas from me and my books

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to you all from me and my books. http://amzn.to/2hWdfmm.

The Kindle edition of my non-fiction book, Living with Postcards is FREE on Amazon today, 22nd until 26th December. My Christmas gift from me to you all. Merry Christmas. All of my Kindles are only £0.99 or equivalent currencies until 31st January. All nine are available in paperback. The Hostile and Her demonic Angel are also on Audible, Amazon and iTunes as audiobooks.

A Christmas gift from me to you

The Kindle edition of Living with Postcards will be FREE on Amazon from tomorrow, 22nd to 26th December. My Christmas gift from me to you all. Merry Christmas.

Living with Postcards is a colour-illustrated non-fiction book that describes my close relationship with old postcards, mostly pre-1924. I’ve collected them since the 1970s and now own over 2,000 of these charming, quirky historic items. Living with Postcards is available on Amazon in paperback and Kindle editions. A beautiful present from the past.

“The author shares her impressive knowledge of vintage postcards in an entertaining and informative style. Brimming with lovely reproductions, it is never dull. A book to read from cover to cover or to dip into. Certainly, a book to revisit. Living with Postcards makes an imaginative present, even to someone like me who has no particular interest in postcard collecting. I can thoroughly recommend it.”

I started enthusiastically collecting postcards whilst writing my main thesis on Fantasy in Postcards at Art College whilst studying for my graphic design degree. My thesis won me a first with distinction, whereas my graphic art annoyingly gained me only a 2:2. My art history tutor suggested I lecture on fantasy in postcards. As I was only twenty-one at the time, I didn’t feel ready to become a lecturer and declined his kind offer. I decided to write this book instead. All the cards in Living with Postcards are from my own large collection. I’m giving a talk at Oldham Coliseum about Living with Postcards in January.

http://amzn.to/22qrcH1 for the UK paperback edition
http://amzn.to/299Jg2c for the USA paperback edition
http://amzn.to/29d6k5T for the UK Kindle edition
http://amzn.to/29gEV0B for the USA Kindle edition

Until 31st January 2017, Kindle editions of all my fiction books are reduced to £0.99 or equivalent currencies on Amazon. They are always free to Kindle Unlimited subscribers. The paperback versions of my nine books won’t break the bank either. On 1st February 2017, my Kindles prices will return to £2.25. If you enjoy audiobooks, two of my books, The Hostile and Her demonic Angel, are available on Amazon, Audible and iTunes as audiobooks.

Please feel free to sneak a peek at the Kindle edition of Living with Postcards here http://amzn.to/2bCIbmY.

In the words of Roger Daltrey, Giving it all away

Revised Potholes and Magic CarpetsThe Kindle edition of Potholes and Magic Carpets is FREE on Amazon today, 19th December and also on the 20th.

The main action in Potholes and Magic Carpets takes place in rural Kent and London. Published on Amazon in paperback and Kindle editions in 2015, my contemporary, character-driven novel looks at the dramatic incidents, challenges and temptations in the lives of four couples of varying ages, professions and sexual persuasions, all linked by either blood or friendship. The negative, selfish, sometimes violent natures of several characters in Potholes and Magic Carpets wreak havoc on the innocent. A tale of not so simple folk.

Here’s a review of Potholes and Magic Carpets on Amazon. Thank you to whoever wrote it. I think they’re American because of the way they spell humour.
“I absolutely LOVE Ms. Mutter’s writing style. Her descriptions are captivating to me, as a lifelong fan of all things “British”, I enjoy her humor and the clarity with which she delivers her characters. I feel like I know them well by the time I’m well into each chapter. This title is on my Christmas list for myself! MERRY CHRISTMAS TO ME! Thanks for sharing your wonderful talents!”

The Kindle edition on Amazon.co.uk: http://amzn.to/29gA3bE
The Kindle edition on Amazon.com: http://amzn.to/29Bawbi
The paperback edition on Amazon.co.uk: http://amzn.to/299FSV3
The paperback edition on Amazon.com: http://amzn.to/29dnSxj

Until 31st January 2017, Kindle editions of all my books are reduced to £0.99 or equivalent currencies on Amazon. They are always free to Kindle Unlimited subscribers. The paperback versions of my nine books won’t break the bank either. On 1st February 2017, my Kindles prices will return to £2.25. If you enjoy audiobooks, two of my books, The Hostile and Her demonic Angel, are available on Amazon, Audible and iTunes as audiobooks. The audiobook of Potholes and Magic Carpets is in production.

Please feel free to sneak a peek at Potholes and Magic Carpets here http://amzn.to/2bHkrQI

lying-scotsman-fingers-crossed-print-plus-textIn other news, I changed the cover of The Lying Scotsman today and have spent the last week shortening the book, although it still is 400 pages long. My writing style has naturally evolved since I started writing The Lying Scotsman, my first book despite being book 2 of The Mug trilogy. It’s the book that first made me want to concentrate full-time on writing.

I wanted to revise the entire book, so I did; one of the benefits of self-publishing. I also used a greyscale image of the original cover, without the text, inside the book, as it would be a shame to waste it. The changes I’ve made will probably go live on Amazon in a few days. It took a while before my improved cover of Random Bullets showed on Amazon, but today I noticed the new cover is up there. I’ve also revised the cover and text of the paperback version of The Lying Scotsman and hopefully the new version will also soon be on Amazon.

lying-scotsman-fingers-crossed-print-back-cover-plus-textI have to put the finishing touches to my hour-long talk about my books that I’m giving on 24th January at Oldham Coliseum.  My daughter is arriving for Christmas on 21st December before she and her husband fly off to New York on Boxing Day to relive when he proposed to her two years ago on the lake in Central Park. Who says romance is dead? Her husband could teach The Lying Scotsman a thing or two, ha!

Merry Christmas and a Happy 2017 to everyone!

A Christmas pressie from me to you

As the festive season is approaching like a bat out of Hell, I’m feeling even more generous than usual. Until 31st January 2017, Kindle editions of all my books are reduced to £0.99 or equivalent currencies on Amazon. They are always free to Kindle Unlimited subscribers. The paperback versions of my nine books won’t break the bank either. On 1st February 2017, my Kindles prices will return to £2.25. If you enjoy audiobooks, two of my books, The Hostile and Her demonic Angel, are available on Amazon, Audible and iTunes as audiobooks.

Here’s the link to my Amazon author page: http://amzn.to/2b96qaj.

To find out more about me and my books or if you fancy reading my blog, reviews and book excerpts, here’s my website’s link: http://joymutter.com.

Look at what’s laying under the Christmas tree for you! You lucky people.

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A seventies Christmas to forget

Christmas was looming and she dreaded it. Lack of funds and only being allowed Christmas and Boxing Day off work, made it impractical to spend Christmas in Jersey, even though she yearned for home. Although in her mid twenties, she still needed her mum at Christmas. Her estranged father lived in America with his new wife. She envied her teenage sister and twenty-three year-old brother. They would be experiencing a proper, full-blown festive season in Jersey, pampered by their mother, who was a wonderful cook, always knowing how to make Christmas a special, magical occasion. Mug earned paltry wages as sole graphic artist at a West London printers and needed to find a better-paid job. Asking her boss for an extra fiver a month had been greeted with a menacing reply of, “You know where the dole queue is!” He had caught her scanning the job vacancy section in a media magazine and gave her the sulky, silent treatment for several tense weeks.
Her bedsit, near Swiss Cottage and Primrose Hill, seemed Dickensian. She was on the top floor of a large, antiquated building that had seen better days, sharing a dilapidated bathroom, complete with corroded taps, scummy bath and poorly flushing toilet, with the occupants of the seven other bedsits. Everything in the house seemed to be shades of brown with none of the vibrant, psychedelic colours prevalent in the seventies. Her low wage made buying furniture impossible. She had to rely on the armchair, single bed, perilous gas cooker, sink and ancient gas fire. The entire house reeked of gas and she feared that she was gradually being poisoned. The rug was so threadbare that the floorboards were visible, draughts rising through it and whistling through the rattling window frames. She was sad to be spending Christmas Day alone in such a hovel, but had no option. At least she had a television for company even though the choice of programs in the seventies was dire. She also had her cassette player if all else failed.
After work on Christmas Eve, she bought a chicken portion, a few potatoes and brussel sprouts to eat on the big day. It was all she could afford, thanks to the stinginess of her boss. As she had neither fridge, freezer, nor table, she placed her purchases on top of the cooker, confident her room was chilly enough to keep it fresh until the next day’s special mealtime. She went for a brisk walk in nearby Regent’s Park, as it was warmer outside than in her bedsit, with its high ceilings, draughts and ineffectual gas fire.
Her best friend, Gill, had given her a bottle of white wine for Christmas and it was to be her one treat. She had no spare cash to buy Christmas decoration or treats.
‘Are you sure you’ll be OK on your own over Christmas? You’re welcome to spend it in Yorkshire with me,’ Gill had kindly offered.
‘Don’t worry about me. I’ll be fine,’ Mug reassured her anxious friend.
The big day dawned and a thrill of excitement tingled in her belly, even though all she had to look forward to was eating her Christmas dinner. To get into the Christmas spirit, she switched on the blurry television to seek out some festive cheer. There was not much choice, in the seventies but the sight of children singing carols warmed her heart, reminding her of how excited she had been as a child at Christmas, when the nativity held more significance. Mobile phones did not exist to contact friends and relatives. There was a pay phone three floors down but she had no money to call home. Her mother may have phoned her to wish her a merry Christmas, but, being so far from the phone, she never heard it ring. There was no internet back then, no opportunity to seek out online human contact or entertainment.
The big moment came to cook the Christmas dinner. After peeling the potatoes, she unwrapped the chicken portion. A strange, fishy smell wafted up from the slimy object. Its pink colour was tinged with an unappetising yellowish green. She was devastated to realise that her chicken had undoubtedly turned rancid and was now inedible. For a split second, she considered cooking it anyway, as she had nothing to replace it with and no money to buy an alternative, even if there had been any shops open. Not wanting to be poisoned she threw the chicken in the bin. She still had to eat, so roasted the potatoes, boiled the sprouts and finished eating in time for the Queen’s speech. Christmas dinner was supposed to be the culinary pinnacle of the year and the severe contrast with her bland meal made her want to cry. The lump in her throat, which felt as big as the brussel sprouts, made it hard to swallow.
Depressed at the thought of the fun Britain was having on what should be a magical day, she uncorked the wine Gill had given her, drinking every bit to numb the solitude. The other bedsits were eerily quiet, as everyone had disappeared to be with relatives or friends over the festive season. She felt like Tiny Tim out in the snow, looking through windows at happy, Dickensian families celebrating Christmas in style. A desire washed over her to jump off any one of the London bridges. She settled instead for crawling into bed, even though it was late afternoon, preferring to sleep the day away in a drunken stupor than to sit wallowing in unattractive self-pity. One thing was certain. She would do anything in her power never again to spend Christmas Day alone.